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Dark Universe’s 15 Obscure Horror Movies to Watch This Halloween

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Obscure Horror Movies

Halloween wouldn’t feel complete without watching one or five obscure horror movies. Mike Myers, the Tall Man and cackling Bette Middler and her Sanderson Sisters are the familiar spooky faces we see on the screens that light up our dark living rooms.

But if you fancy a bit more variety this October here are a few lesser known films to delve into:

1. Idle Hands (1999)

Lazy waster Anton (Final Destinations Devon Sawa) wakes up to find his parents murdered by his own hand which has been possessed by the Devil. With the help of his stoner-turned-zombie friends Seth Green and Elden Henson, Anton must stop his own appendage from causing any more mayhem, while also trying to get his own hand on Jessica Alba.

With a silly, dark sense of humour, a skate punk soundtrack (including an Offspring cameo) and funny violent set pieces, Idle Hands is very much a product of the 90’s. Imagine a bloodier version of Dude, Where’s My Car?

Idle Hands

2. Blood on Satan’s Claw (1971)

Alongside the Wicker Man and Witchfinder General this makes up the three films referred to as the original British folk horror trio. Despite the latter two’s classic status I consider Blood on Satan’s Claw to be the superior of the three. With it’s hauntingly beautifully score, seethingly sensual performances and steadily increasing Satanic violence the film is a must watch.

When a mysterious plague infects an isolated 18th century farm community the villagers form a ritualistic cult with sinister purposes…

Blood on Satan’s Claw

3. Captain Kronos: Vampire Hunter (1974)

Despite the absence of Christopher Lee or Peter Cushing this is one of the greatest vampire films ever produced by Hammer.

Roaming the countryside with his hunchback sidekick, flamboyant vampire hunter Captain Kronos has his blades at the ready to do battle with the forces of evil.

What makes this stand out from other Hammer films is the well-choreographed sword fights between Kronos and his blood sucking enemies.

Captain Kronos Vampire Hunter

4. Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell (1974)

Portraying him for the sixth and final time Peter Cushing returns as Baron Frankenstein, this time housed as a surgeon in an insane asylum.

Taking an apprentice under his wing, he decides to create a new creature from the body parts of his murdered patients.

The Frankenstein creature played by David Prowse is a bit silly looking. But Cushing’s performance as the soft spoken yet obsessively driven Baron makes this film ideal for fans of his work.

Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell

5. Funny Man (1994)

A very strange and trippy British indie horror about a music producer who beats Christopher Lee in a poker game and wins his mansion. The home happens to be occupied by a reality bending wisecracking homicidal harlequin.

It’s weirdness has to be seen to be believed. If you ever wanted to see Mr. Punch do a strip tease or Velma from Scooby Doo have her head explode then this is the film for you.

Funny Man

6. Severance (2006)

A group of co-workers on a team building exercise are hunted down by masked men in the woods. It takes the group a while to realise just how much trouble they’re in. Danny Dyer takes magic mushrooms and wanders around, unaware of the brutal nightmare just ahead of him. The mixture of brilliant comedy, gruesome violence and genuine sense of threat makes Severance a classic of British horror not to be missed.

Severance

7. Witchboard (1986)

As soon as you hear the opening theme performed by Steel Breeze you’ll know this is a very mid 80’s movie.

At a party, stuck up yuppie Brandon uses a Ouija board to contact David, the ghost of a ten year old boy.

When Brandon’s ex-girlfriend Linda gets hold of the board she inadvertently summons the spirit of an axe murderer and her life begins to unravel.

Lesser known actress Kathleen Wilhoite gives a great performance as a psychic that makes this movie worth watching simply for the few scenes she is in.

Witchboard

8. Night of the Demons (1988)

Another ever so 80’s horror movie also directed by Witchboard‘s Kevin S. Tenney. Though not particularly original it’s tone and goth rock atmosphere make it perfect for Halloween viewing.

When Angela hosts a party at an abandoned mortuary it leads to a séance which unleashes demons which prey on the party guests. Worth a watch for the dance scene alone.

Night of the Demons

9. Leprechaun Back 2 tha Hood (2003)

By this sixth instalment of the Leprechaun series Warwick Davis had already been to the ghetto and even SPACE! They were so out of ideas they decided to let the pint sized demon loose in the hood for a second time. And it is fantastic. It expands the mythology of the killer leprechaun and has enough silly gory fun to make this movie far better than it has any right to be.

Leprechaun: Back 2 tha Hood

10. Rogue (2007)

Greg McLean, the director of Wolf Creek creates another tense, picturesque outback shocker.

A group of tourists taking an Australian river boat tour become stranded on a small island. As the tide slowly consumes the land they shelter on they are hunted by a colossal crocodile.

If you fancy watching a polished creature feature with a realistic and scary monster then look no further. The croc doesn’t look rubber or naff as you’d expect from this kind of movie. The escalating situation keeps the tension and pacing up.

Rogue

11. The Ugly (1997)

Told through flashbacks a New Zealand serial killer called Simon tells his tragic life story to a psychiatrist who wishes to determine why he chose his seemingly random victims.

Through the course of their sessions Simon reveals his dark past and the existence of a malevolent voice in his head called The Ugly.

This film is very bleak and visceral. Blood appears dark black making the violence extra sickening. There is an atmosphere of decay and repression. Not one to watch if you fancy something lighthearted but perfect for Silence of the Lambs fans.

The Ugly

12. Repo! the Genetic Opera (2008)

Fancy a musical? Here’s a mad, colourful, bombastic, gory sci fi rock opera that comments on the health industry. Set in a future where organ replacements are commonplace, those who cannot afford to meet their payment fees on time are visited by a scalpel slinging repo man played by Anthony Head, who forcibly removes their overdue organs.

With gross Saw-style violence, nonstop musical numbers, a sick sense of humour and Paris Hilton this film is for a very specific audience. It’s not for everyone but fans of Rocky Horror will surely fall in love with it’s grotesque characters, stylish visuals and general weirdness.

Repo! the Genetic Opera

13. Deadly Friend (1986)

One of Wes Craven’s lesser loved obscure horror works. Even if you haven’t seen it you may have stumbled across a clip of the infamous basketball exploding head scene on Youtube.

When Paul moves to a new town with his robot BB he soon falls in love with Samantha (Kristy Swanson). The romance doesn’t last long as Sam is killed by her abusive father. Paul inputs BB’s chip into Sam’s brain, reanimating her. Paul must now control his violent, mechanical zombie girlfriend.

This movie is certainly flawed, cursed by recuts that jumble up a dark love story, silly robot hijinks and over the top violence into something with a very confused tone. If you can get past the muddled tone you’ll find something quite unique.

Deadly Friend

14. The Dentist 2 (1998)

If you’re going to watch this make sure it’s not before a check-up.

Brian Yuzna returns to direct the sequel to his original pain-fest about an unhinged dentist who takes his frustrations out on his patients. Yuzna brings in disturbingly accurate special effects that make the dental torture scenes unbearably horrific.

It follows maniacal Dr Feinstone who escapes from a mental asylum and sets up shop as a dentist in a small, unassuming town. You could check out the original beforehand and make it a double feature, though it might put you off eating any Halloween candy.

The Dentist 2

15. The Slayer (1982)

Despite originally being banned as a “video nasty” this 1982 eerie, dreamlike arthouse slasher is more intelligent than it’s reputation would have you believe.

When two couples become stranded on an island during a hurricane an unseen force begins hunting them. Nothing is quite as it seems and reality is constantly being questioned in this violent and enigmatic horror gem.

It’s perfect to watch on a stormy night.

The Slayer

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