Connect with us

Horror Lists

Top 100 List of the Best Slasher Horror Movies to Watch This Halloween Night for a Bloody Good Time

Published

on

Top 100 List of the Best Slasher Horror Movies to Watch This Halloween Night for a Bloody Good Time

With the help of the enthusiastic horror community over on our official Twitter account, we have managed to put together the following mega list of beloved horror titles, featuring 100 of the very best slasher movies to watch this Halloween season for a bloody good night of gruesome fun. Please share your thoughts, if any, down in our comments section.

You can check out our extensive list of the top 100 best slasher movies below, as chosen by the horror community (in no particular order).


1. A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) 

Community choice by Avery McReynolds @AJMcReynolds

Wes Craven’s legacy is made up of many inspirational horror films, but one that continues to affect us is Nightmare on Elm Street. Robert Englund’s portrayal of antagonist Freddy Krueger is one of the scariest in the genre, and Heather Langenkamp’s Nancy Thompson is one of the strongest final girls in the entirety of horror. With most other horror movies, there’s some sort of catch; the characters are at the wrong place at the wrong time, they’ve done something bad to anger the antagonist, or the place is haunted. However, with A Nightmare on Elm Street, the idea that you don’t have a choice, you have to sleep, makes Freddy all the more difficult to brush off.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

A Nightmare on Elm Street 1984 Freddy


2. American Psycho (2000)

Community choice by Chelsea Rose @chelsea_burnham

Based on Bret Easton Ellis’ novel of the same name, American Psycho is a dark, satirical take on the idea that psychopaths can hide within plain sight. A psychological thriller that also works to somewhat turn the traditional slasher film on its head, this is a film that takes the risk of telling the story from the point of view of the killer himself. It is apparent that Patrick Bateman, the demented protagonist of this film, does not exhibit any sort of pattern or discrimination with whom he chooses to kill. From homeless men, to escort girls, to his own coworkers, he implements murder methods that include knives, guns, and even chainsaws. However, it is clear that he does still stalk and plan out the murders of his victims when he is allotted the opportunity to do so. Through the decision to use Patrick as the narrator for his own horror story, we are offered a glimpse into the reasoning that he appears to come up with for committing such horrific acts throughout the film. While some may find the film to be more thriller than slasher, we cannot deny the memorable splatter offered by the axe scene, set to the upbeat tone of Huey Lewis and the News.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

American Psycho 2000


3. You’re Next (2011)

Community choice by Chelsea Rose @chelsea_burnham

You’re Next starts off as a film that appears to be a mash up between a home invasion horror and a classic slasher. Within the setting of a dysfunctional family reuniting, the film progresses to become more complex than a simple murder spree as it is revealed that some family members have darker secrets than others. You’re Next has enough twists and turns mixed into its suspenseful plot to keep the viewer interested, all while taking what we love in a traditional slasher and making it fresh and more realistic. It is a film that offers us creative death scenes and booby traps that would make Kevin McCallister proud. Further, it provides us with a strong female lead in the form of Erin, who successfully takes the place of the traditional final girl that usually struggles to find her footing when faced with danger before becoming triumphant in the end. Erin is the wrench in the system that causes this murder plot to go wrong when it is apparent that she has a few secrets of her own and is able to always be one step ahead of the killers at every turn. Overall, it is a fun watch that will keep you glued to the screen as the plot unravels throughout its duration.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

You’re Next 2011


4. Haunt (2019)

Community choice by Chelsea Rose @chelsea_burnham

Probably one of the newer films on this list, 2019’s Haunt is on its way to becoming an instant classic, as it has successfully breathed fresh life into the standard haunted-house-gone-wrong trope. With the a traditional storyline of unsuspecting friends who are out seeking a good time on Halloween night, six college students find themselves in a haunted house that poses more risk than thrill. What begins as a night filled with classic gags and mirror tricks soon has these young adults fighting for their lives as they come to realize that the staged death earlier in the night wasn’t as fake as they believed it to be. This is a film that has a decent body count, with some of the kills paying homage to memorable death scenes from classic slashers. It’s a perfect slasher to watch during Halloween season and it sticks to the classic formula in a way that any horror lover will appreciate.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. DVD RIGHT HERE!

Haunt 2019


5. Candyman (1992)

Community choice by Robby @xzimkidx

The score, the cast, the carnage and the mythology all work to compliment each other so well that it’s easy to see why Candyman still holds up remarkably well. The choice to move the story from Liverpool to the streets of Chicago and give the title character a tragic, racially fuelled backstory was a bold choice that clearly paid off and has kept this particular adaptation relevant, even more so in the current political climate we live in. Virginia Madsen always shines in everything she’s in, and Tony Todd toes the line between terrifying and seductive. His every delivery has an almost hypnotic poetic quality that resonates so well in the back of your mind long after the credits roll. To this day, I’m still very aware of my surroundings in parking structures, and I definitely won’t turn off the light until I’m fully out of the bathroom.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Candyman 1992 Tony Todd


6. Halloween (1978)

Community choice by Avery McReynolds@AJMcReynolds

If I were to ask horror fanatics, cinephiles, aspiring filmmakers, or mainstream moviegoers — anyone — what makes John Carpenter’s Halloween a standout, successful horror picture, virtually every single one of them would tell me something different. Irwin Yablan’s simplistic concept, John and Debra’s creative and ambitious storytelling, Dean Cundey’s beautiful cinematography, or the menacing presence of antagonist, Michael Myers, stalking the congenial, gregarious babysitters of small-town America, led by Jamie Lee Curtis. To be totally honest, it’s a trick question. However, the answer lies in every single response. Though not without its flaws, the brilliance of Halloween stems from its creative team, both behind and in front of the camera. Carpenter’s direction and score composition are complimented by Cundey’s photography. Use is made of the background and foreground, the left and right side, the darkness and the light. Halloween is a classic worthy of its praise.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Halloween 1978 Michael Myers Stairs


7. Happy Birthday to Me (1981)

Community choice by Joshua Yoakam – @ScreamSelling

Happy Birthday to Me is an early “canux-ploitation” slasher from the producers of My Bloody Valentine. Like that film, this is a giallo-inspired who-done-it with a game cast, including Melissa Sue Anderson in the lead, playing against her squeaky clean “Little House on the Prairie” image. Anderson’s Virginia is recovering from a TBI and the radical surgery performed to save her has her jumping at shadows as she re-enters private school life in her circle of the elites of the campus. Part of what sets this film apart (other than the memorable, if inaccurate, marketing material) is a surreal sense of psychological dread and a feeling that anything can happen. Could Virginia be behind the deaths that begin claiming the others at Crawford Acadamy? Veteran director J. Lee Thompson (Cape Fear) weaves a spell with a mercurial script (one that kept twisting and changing even during filming) and has a knack for building tightly wound suspense. A taut high society teen thriller with multiple red herrings that sticks out from the pack of “Holiday” slashers. After all, any day could be someone’s birthday…

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Happy Birthday to Me 1981


8. April Fool’s Day (1986)

Community choice by Joanna Bolouri @scribbles78

Don’t you just hate it when your old mate Muffy invites you and your suspiciously old looking college friends to her island for Spring Break and then someone starts violently murdering everyone offscreen? Directed by Fred Walton (When a Stranger Calls) and starring Amy Steel (final girl Ginny from Friday the 13th: Part 2) and Biff from Back to the Future (alongside other actors you’ve seen in stuff but can’t quite place without looking up IMDB), April Fool’s Day is a fun, smart little eighties stalk and slash film that doesn’t take itself or it’s gaping plot holes too seriously.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

April Fool’s Day 1986


9. Splatter University (1984)

Community choice by TJ @tjsquishface

I have a soft spot for movies with groin or breast stabbings. Luckily this movie has both in the first 5 minutes. Buckle up, folks. We’re talking about Splatter University! Splatter University is a 1984 slasher film that feels a bit like Pieces, but focuses more on the fun of the genre than being scary. Expect plenty of stabbings, Budweiser promotion, obnoxious college people, and all the sexual jokes you can handle! Directed by Richard Haines who later went on to direct Class of Nuke ‘Em High, this movie is best watched with a few friends and cold beverages.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Splatter University 1984


10. Halloween II (1981)

Community choice by Avery McReynolds @AJMcReynolds

Picking up precisely where its predecessor left off, Halloween II ups the body count and sheds both blood and light on the motivation of antagonist Michael Myers. Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) is taken from the Doyle House to Haddonfield Memorial Hospital, wherein she reflects on the night’s terrifying events. She’s aware her assailant is not dead; a truth the graveyard shift staff come to find out as the night progresses, and Doctor Loomis (Donald Pleasenc) continues his search for Michael. Dean Cundey’s cinematography is once again on point, with John Carpenter and Alan Howarth beefing up the original’s score with some added material.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Halloween II 1981 The Shape


11. Hell Night (1981)

Community choice by Jason LeMaitre @athesphatic

Four coeds must spend the night in a haunted mansion to overcome a college hazing ritual and are stalked by a brutish maniac bent on bloodshed.

With a director previously known for porn and starring an already sinfully type-cast Linda Blair, Hell Night originally confused audiences by delivering a sexually timid and decidedly non-satanic horror story set, instead, within a haunted estate.

This movie, however, also has lots to offer fans of slice-and-dice cinema: college coeds, a restricted location, a bodycount rivaling Friday the 13th (released just one year prior), unique kills for each victim by a seemingly unstoppable force, and murderous carnage dispatched by a physical, non-paranormal perpetrator.

Receiving a mixed reception upon its debut (considered not sexy or gory enough compared to other releases of the time), Hell Night has since garnered a cult following and well-deserved praise for blending ghost story, haunted house, and killer sub-genres into a cohesive frightfest which later inspired future classics such as Scream with its innovative “double killer” formula. The film’s mixed-bag storytelling approach means it may have slipped by more veteran viewers and should provide an unexpected surprise to slasher connoisseurs.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Hell Night 1981


12. Stage Fright (1987)

Community choice by Chris Stonnell @BaritoneNC

Directed by Michael Soavi, protégé of genre masters Fulci and Argento, Stage Fright takes place at a late-night rehearsal of a Broadway-style show about a local serial killer. Kind of like Waiting for Guffman’s “Red, White and Blaine” but with more dead prostitutes. Through a series of spectacular coincidences, the very killer the play is based on gets locked in with them. The actions of the play soon begin to translate to real life – but without the fake blood and rubber knives – as the killer methodically dispatches the troupe in deliciously gratuitous blood-soaked ways. No puny hockey or Shatner masks here – this silent slayer sports an enormous owl-head and doesn’t give a hoot if you like his costume choice. Because this is apparently the only theatre on earth with only one exit our ramshackle group of thespians must find the one key to that one door or it’s curtains for them all…

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Stage Fright 1987


13. Friday the 13th (1980)

Community choice by Andy CT @AndyCTWrites

There’s a lot to be said for a film that launched a long-running franchise, and popularised several genre tropes on the strength of a first entry which doesn’t even feature the series’ iconic antagonist until 90 minutes in! In stark contrast to the near parody levels of excess the series would eventually reach, the original Friday is a gentler and more conservative movie. Serving as prologue to the initial four-part arc of the series, we’re treated to a number of what would become future genre hallmarks: The Prophet of Doom, correlations between transgression and a violent death and general summer camp carnage are all proudly on display.

While the effects may show their age, and cut-aways on kills may make this feel like a tamer entry overall. We all know the perils of forgetting that it was our chunky knit fashion queen Pam Vorhees that kicked off this genre juggernaut…Right?

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Friday the 13th Pamela Voorhees


14. The Slayer (1982)

Community choice by Andy Roberts @RacketyEsperus

Before Wes Craven’s seminal classic A Nightmare on Elm Street, there was another monster stalking its prey in the dream world. J.S. Cardone’s The Slayer debuted in 1982, recounting the tale of Kay, an imaginative artist plagued since childhood with terrifying nightmares of a strange humanoid figure who attempts to kill her. Taking a much desired holiday with her husband, brother and sister-in-law on a remote island, the tranquil paradise does little to assuage Kay’s fears, which become reality when her family begin to be killed by an unseen assailant. Desperate to prevent any further butchery, Kay attempts everything to keep from falling asleep and allowing the monster out of her dreams. With atmospheric desolate locations, nightmarish imagery, a frightening antagonist and a plethora of gory deaths (including fishing hooks to the face and pitchfork through the chest), The Slayer is all but essential viewing for tantalised slasher fans.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

The Slayer 1982


15. Intruder (1989)

Community choice by Chris Stonnell @BaritoneNC

On the surface Intruder is another formulaic Mad-Libs fill in the blanks ‘80s slasher with a supermarket filling in for the eponymous summer camp, slumber party, or cabin in the woods. The set-up is simple – the stock crew of said supermarket is working overnight in preparation for a going out of business sale. Soon enough, they start being offed in creative, gory, and creatively gory ways by a mysterious killer. Although relatively unknown, the film is considered “one of the last great ‘80s slashers” but what makes it special is it’s also essentially an Evil Dead reunion. The film is directed by Scott Speigel, who co-wrote Evil Dead II, stars both Sam and Ted Raimi, and features a cameo by no-less-than Bruce Campbell. So, if you like a blend of Three Stooges gags, ridiculous camera shots, Italian giallo level gore, and witty one-liners then you will LOVE this film!

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Intruder 1989 Still


16. Final Destination (2000)

Community choice by Lucia Zelenia – @LuciaZelenia

Final Destination is, save for a couple of kills, perhaps the most realistic horror film out there. Ninety percent of the deaths are at least plausible, even probable. Hell, I still do my best to get out from behind a lumber truck if I’m driving down the highway. And even if the later films rely too much on CG animation, the brutality comes in the fact that these deaths seen on screen could reasonably happen. Even the biggest, wildest Rube Goldberg machines that Death takes advantage of are grounded in some sense of reality, and it makes sleeping after watching the film a little more difficult.

And isn’t that what we’re all looking for in a horror film?

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Final Destination 2000 Image


17. Don’t Go in the House (1979)

Community choice by Andy Roberts @RacketyEsperus

In a much-needed change of tone, Joseph Ellison’s Don’t Go in the House is a bleakly dark tale of childhood abuse, overbearing mothers and a fiery desire for vengeance. Having suffered through countless burns on his mother’s stove in an attempt to scorch the evil out of him, young man Don is utterly aghast when he finds his mother has passed away while he was at work. Infused with childish glee at his newfound unlimited freedom, Don finds it difficult to move on from his traumatic past and after witnessing a work colleague burn at work, he makes it his new mission to lure women into his home and enacts his fantasised revenge against them with a flamethrower. With clear inspiration drawn from Hitchcock’s Psycho, Ellison’s film is an altogether much more disturbing slasher film for those who wish to dispense with the niceties for once.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Don't Go in the House 1979


18. Alice, Sweet Alice (1976)

Community choice by Allison Reagan@AllisonJReagan

In horror films, a child lead is usually the primary threat (The Omen), a conduit (The Exorcist), or the primary victim (Poltergeist). Alice, Sweet Alice (1976) is unique in that the titular character is none of the above. The movie centers around twelve-year-old Alice and the supposition that she has killed her people-pleasing younger sister and is now targeting the adults around her. Alice is innocent but, instead, in her explicitly pubescent state, is a stand-in for the Difficult Woman. The message is underscored by Catholic themes, which represent the ultimate capital-”P” Patriarchy that vilifies these characteristics in women. Over the course of the movie, Alice is a seen-and-heard woman developing agency against the backdrop of another woman’s killing spree, a madwoman not coincidentally devoted to the Church. It’s all very pertinent today, which begs the question: was Alice ahead of its time, or has nothing really changed?

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Alice, Sweet Alice Movie Image


19. Prom Night (1980)

Community choice by Andy Roberts @RacketyEsperus

Hot on the heels of box office success Friday the 13th, Paul Lynch’s Canadian horror Prom Night took up the slasher template and infused it with choreographed dancing, high school hijinx and a crafty agile killer. Young Robin is accidentally killed when her classmates Wendy, Nick, Jude and Kelly bully her, causing her to fall to her death. Many years later, Robin’s twin brother Alex and older sister Kim are preparing for Hamilton High’s prom night, when a mysterious stalker begins to call the kids and threaten them. With a creepy groundskeeper and an escaped sex offender on the loose, the frolicking teenagers find themselves unable to prevent their own grisly demises at the hands of a vengeful assassin. Bags of atmosphere and tension, a charming suffusion of ‘80s disco and appearances from Leslie Nielsen and Halloween’s Jamie Lee Curtis make this classic a worthwhile addition to any slasher collection.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Prom Night 1980 Jamie Lee Curtis


20. Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982)

Community choice by Josh LaFollette @joshlafo

Nearly 40 years since its release, Halloween III still remains the most controversial entry in the series. Even as one of its passionate defenders, it’s not hard to see why. Growing weary of the mythology they created for the first two films, John Carpenter and Debra Hill only returned to the series on the condition that they could devise a wholly original concept for the next installment. Jettisoning Michael Myers and the people of Haddonfield, Carpenter and Hill crafted a story that’s part sci-fi conspiracy thriller, part satire of ‘80s consumerism. For fans missing the familiar elements of the series, Season of the Witch still offers emotionless killers in the form of homicidal automatons, and a tense synth score co-written by Carpenter. The delightfully bizarre plot about a Druid cult masquerading as a novelties corporation is just a bonus. Halloween III was supposed to reboot the franchise as a horror anthology series, with each film featuring a standalone plot inspired by the titular holiday. Disappointing box office returns, alongside brutal responses from fans and critics, convinced the producers to resurrect Michael Myers for the next film instead. Though widely rejected upon its release, Season of the Witch remains a fascinating artifact from a failed experiment, and its legion of fans seems to grow every October.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Halloween III: Season of the Witch Masks


21. I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997)

Community choice by Alicia Skye @Ridr_onthestorm

Mostly overshadowed by Scream the year before, I Know What You Did Last Summer is in my opinion, a quintessential view for 90s horror as well as the slasher sub genre. Very loosely based on the early 70s suspense novel of the same name, our lovable cast is the draw card to this movie – Sarah Michelle Gellar, Jennifer Love Hewitt, Ryan Phillippe and Freddie Prinze Jr are our four teens, caught up in a revenge cat and mouse plot by the fisherman and his fishing hook after a tragic turn of events took place the year before. From the creepy threatening notes, to the attacks before the fatalities, the gang trying to figure out who is toying with them along the way, this movie draws you right in, wondering how the killer is going to outdo himself on the next kill. It is my favourite 90s horror film, higher than Scream (in my opinion) and I’m not sure if it’s the relatable growing up and drifting apart aspect mixed with the fun slasher atmosphere, but it deserves to be on the Top 100 Slashers List. It’s fast paced and you tend to care for at least two of the main characters, I know I did. Hook into it and see if it catches you in it’s grasp too. (Too much puns? I digress.) But also check out the sequel, I Still Know What You Did Last Summer because it’s worth a watch and the love too. (Forget about the third entry though, unless you have alcohol or dares involved).

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

I Know What You Did Last Summer Killer


22. Dr Giggles (1992)

Community choice by Alicia Skye @Ridr_onthestorm

I first saw Dr. Giggles on a midday movie timeslot back in the early 2000’s. It was right around the time I was getting into the tamer side of horror. However our resident villain, Dr. Evan Rendell has a twisted back story. His father was a doctor and like all good little serial killers, Little Evan wanted to be a doctor too. From experimenting on way too many stuffed toys, his mother dying and having to crawl out of her sewn up corpse after his father was found out by the town to have killed a few of the locals after going mad, it’s no surprise he winds up in the nearby mental institution. A grown up Evan Rendell breaks out of the funny farm and returns home. Wackiness along with medical puns ensues. I wouldn’t say it’s gore heavy, they do make use with fake blood in a few scenes but a lot of the scene fades or cutaways leave it to your imagination, sound effects and shadows to learn what has befallen the good doctor’s next victim. Featuring a pre-Charmed Holly Marie Combs and a young Glen Quinn (rest in peace) along with Larry Drake (rest in peace) portraying our lovable and giggling doctor, Dr. Giggles is definitely worth checking out.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Dr Giggles 1992


23. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)

Community choice by Jacob Harper @JacobAtTheMovie

Ever since diving into the deep dark abyss of horror films at the appropriate age of six years old, none have shocked, scared, petrified, intrigued or inspired more than Tobe Hoppers original 1974 exploitation horror film The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. The film remains to me as such a once in a century phenomenon. It’s realistic yet disturbing vibe that makes you think “This cannot be happening, yet it’s so real”. I have yet to see that in any film the way I’ve seen it in Texas Chainsaw Massacre. It’s low budget of less than 140,000 dollars was used well in making a not just memorable film, but a scarring exploitation flick that lives in the back of people’s minds forever after watching it. The set pieces, effects, costumes, makeup, and again the set pieces just sew this film into an unforgettable nightmare. The practical effects and set pieces really make you appreciate this film even more. The house had no AC, and contained actual animal bones and raw meat. Gunnar Hansen (the actor for Leatherface) was isolated from the cast and crew for most of the production to keep him in character, and that thick leather mask certainly didn’t do him any favors when he was inside that house. At one point they even really cut Marilyn Burns hand, they couldn’t get the fake blood to track with the knife and after many takes Marilyn took one for the team and just had her finger split open for real. Talk about devotion to the role. This film remains as one of the most disturbing pieces of film I have ever seen, even though only a splash of blood is really used for one or two scenes. The acting all feels genuine and even some of it was improvised in the moment (mostly from the Sawyers), adding to the unpredictability yet realistic feel of the antagonistic clan. All of this is why Tobe Hoppers The Texas Chainsaw Massacre is one of my all-time favorite slasher movies, as well as one of my favorite films of all time and a constant inspiration as a horror screenwriter and filmmaker.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 1974 Leatherface


24. The Town That Dreaded Sundown (1976)

Community choice by Alicia Skye @Ridr_onthestorm

Arguably among the very first slasher films. Predating the 80s slasher boom by 4 years. This film is based on the true unsolved Texarkana Moonlight Murders of 1946. It’s unique in that we have a Narrator (voiced by Vern Stierman) guiding us through the film. A very cool aspect of the film is that the gruesome inventive kills are from The Phantom Killer’s point of view. With a runtime of an hour and 30 minutes, the film ends with the haunting message that the killer is still out there and could be anyone, even someone seeing the screening of the film we’ve just witnessed. Bringing home the terrifying notion that these murders are still unsolved today. There was a sequel/remake in 2014 that is worth checking out. It’s filming techniques are different and that story tries to make sense of the killings with an actual villain named. Charles B Pierce’s Town That Dreaded Sundown will always have a special place in slasher history for it’s originality.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

The Town That Dreaded Sundown


25. The Prowler (1981)

Community choice by Alicia Skye @Ridr_onthestorm

Right around the time the Slasher sub-genre was popular among teen based killers, The Prowler (also known as Rosemary’s Killer) is often forgotten with other contenders such as My Bloody Valentine, Friday The 13th: Part 2, Halloween II and a slew of other entries all releasing in the same year. It stands out to me for the graphic and gore filled kills by our villain dressed in a GI uniform who loves to utilize a pitchfork and machete, leaving a rose as his signature. The kills are all the more special with effects being done by the great Tom Savini. The most notable kill being Sherry impaled in the shower by the pitchfork and Lisa being killed in the pool which is shown on the most popular posters for the film. With a runtime of an hour and 29 minutes, The Prowler is quick to get into the kills, leaving the rest of the story to be fleshed out along the way right up until the killer’s reveal.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

The Prowler 1981


26. The Burning (1981)

Community choice by Joshua Yoakam – @ScreamSelling

I come only to praise The Burning, but fair warning: This was written and produced by Harvey Weinstein and launched his career. If that’s a deal-breaker, I absolutely respect that and ask that you hop to the next entry. But…

The Burning was crafted in the immediate wake of Friday the 13th’s success and the initial boom that followed didn’t quite nail the exact same plot beats that would drive slashers in the following years, they just saw summer camp plus dead kids equaled box office. This meant you got Wild West cinema like this adaptation of the legend of Cropsey – one that spends just as much time on the zany hijinks of camp as the scares, until building to one of the most stunning and brutal kill scenes in slasher history; a set-piece that absolutely astounds with make-up effects by a game Tom Savini. By existing before the rules were set in stone, The Burning defies them and promises new frights to even jaded fans. It catches you when you feel the safest. The film also features a likable and game cast of up-and-comers that included Fisher Stevens as camp wise-guy Woodstock, Helen Hunt in a mostly background role as Sophie, and a captivating bro performance from Jason Alexander (with a full head of hair!) as Dave.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

The Burning 1981


27. Alone in the Dark (1982)

Community choice by Chris Stonnell@BaitoneNC

Institutionalized psychopaths are convinced that their new doctor (Dwight Schultz – Murdock from “The A-Team”) murdered their previous caretaker – who just took a better job – and thus, must “kill him back”. The bloodthirsty maniacs include an intense commando (Jack Palance), a pyromaniac preacher (Martin Landau), a physically-imposing pedophile, and a serial killer called “The Bleeder” (for chronic nosebleeds, duh), who at one point even dons a (technically pre-Jason) hockey mask! Due to lax security measures by head psychiatrist Dr. Bain, played by an herb-smoking Donald Pleasance, the maniacs escape during a blackout. With the town in a panic, the four escapees embark on a string of brutal murders, that culminates in a siege on the home of Dr. Potter (Schultz) and family. Despite a few cheesy ‘80’s moments (a lame hair metal band), the movie is extremely well-acted, has an A-list cast, and a plot twist you won’t see coming.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. DVD RIGHT HERE!

Alone in the Dark 1982


28. Psycho (1960)

Community choice by Allison Reagan@AllisonJReagan

It’s the film that launched a thousand baths. Everyone and their, well, mother has a story of how they or someone close to them refused to shower after watching Psycho (1960). Before the soft-spoken twenty-something white dude killer became the well-worn trope it is now, clean-cut Norman Bates was a Freudian nightmare adapted from the Robert Bloch novel. Hitchcock’s masterpiece spawned imitators and allusions, sequels and a series, a remake and a 2012 biopic about the making of the movie. It’s a string of iconic scenes and cinematic firsts set to an influential and instantly recognizable score. Some cite Peeping Tom (1960) as the first real slasher but, arguably and to this day, no one has done it better than the master of suspense himself. Inventive and influential slashers have come along since Psycho, but you can’t have a list of the best without including the “mother” of them all.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Psycho 1960 Shower Scene


29. Night School (1981)

Community choice by Josh Ellis@scouse_91

Night School is one of those that is heavily debated on whether it’s a slasher or not. To me? It’s a slasher hands down. A good one as well. Sure it has moments of Giallo and scenes of police drama, but at it’s core it’s a slasher. Hugely underrated during the glut of slasher movies that came out in the 80s. Check this one out if you haven’t already!

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Night School 1981


30. Madman (1981)

Community choice by Andy Roberts @RacketyEsperus

In the spirit of Friday the 13th and The Burning, the slasher film is married once again to summer camp in Madman, featuring another campfire boogeyman stalking unwary counselors. At camp, head counselor Max relates the story of Madman Marz, a crazed farmer who was hanged after inexplicably murdering his family, though he escaped into the woods and faded into obscurity, only emerging when his name is called. Smartass Richie inadvertently summons the ghastly killer to the campgrounds where he embarks on a murderous rampage. It’s up to Betsy to safeguard the children and defeat Marz before they all become a part of the legend themselves. While similar to other summer camp stalk ‘n’ slash titles, Madman’s combination of charming characters, an iconic killer and array of fun deaths (like a car bonnet decapitation and a chillingly realistic hanging) allow it a deserved place in the annals of slasher history.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Madman 1981


31. Black Christmas (1974)

Community choice by Tiffany Aleman@FakeTiffanyAle

Black Christmas was the beginning of the first wave of slasher films in the 70s though not the first of its type. The Texas Chain Saw Massacre was released ten days before Black Christmas in October of 1974. But it had a significant influence on Halloween (1978) which inspired Friday the 13th in turn in 1980 though some derided the first Friday the 13th as a weak copy. But how else do genres form? Scholars say that early Italian Giallo films, Hitchcock’s Psycho and Frenzy, and cult films like Peeping Tom were the original prototypical slashers of the subgenre. But Black Christmas helped to initiate and define a golden era of slashers. It’s one of Steve Martin’s favorite movies. Black Christmas featured talents like Olivia Hussey (Romeo and Juliet), Margot Kidder (Sisters, The Amityville Horror), and Andrea Martin of SCTV in a role that was originally offered to Gilda Radner. I don’t blame her for turning it down for SNL. For the murder in Black Christmas is original and terrifying. There’s a bizarre hook-hanging, a plastic suffocation that ends in a rocking chair, and a woman pulverized to death with a glass unicorn. The brutality is specific and creative which makes Black Christmas particularly haunting. The creepiest moment is when the murderer crank calls the sorority house on a rotary phone. We lean in to listen to several minutes of whispers, insults, cackles, pig snorting, and a final chilling threat: I’m going to kill you. The camera travels slowly around the room and we watch the sorority girls react — it’s an incredible moment because it’s so real. My favorite reaction is when Barb (played by Kidder) tells the crank-caller off after grading his dirty-talk as, “not bad.” But there are repercussions for dismissing him and Barb’s death is the most brutal of them. Black Christmas is a metaphor for how difficult life can be for womxn in a patriarchal world. Because the Final Girl is never truly safe, is she? I need to rewatch Scream again. Black Christmas is streaming on Shudder, be sure to watch or revisit it though I’d suggest waiting for the holiday season for an extra jolt of terror.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Black Christmas 1974 Jess


32. The Strangers (2008)

Community choice by Chelsea Rose@chelsea_burnham

The Strangers is a psychological horror hybrid that combines the terror of home invasion with elements of classical slasher stereotypes. While some may believe this to be more of a home invasion film, it still incorporates the vital elements of a slasher film that we hold dear by having the killers stalk their victims in a relaxed and familiar setting prior to striking. Despite the combination of sub-genres, it is at its core a stalk and murder film that gives no real background or motive to the villains. However, it does take a step in a different direction by having the killers unmask themselves for their victims to see once morning comes, which lets them know that their fate is sealed. Though the film produces a low body count, it goes to prove that often times simplicity can be just as terrifying as complexity, with the killers offering up the only explanation for the horrific events of the evening through the chilling and memorable quote: “Because you were home.”

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Man in the Mask Stalks


33. Behind the Mask: The Rise of Leslie Vernon (2006)

Community choice by Daniel Torkel@DrZaiusGoD

Five years before Cabin in the Woods made meta-horror trendy again, Behind the Mask: The Rise of Leslie Vernon asked an original and unique question of horror fans. What if Freddy, Michael and Jason were real people with elaborate backstories, mythologies and a keen sense of planning? Scott Glosserman’s 2006 film introduces you to Leslie Vernon, a young, charming and charismatic man who wants to be known alongside the great slashers in horror history. To do this he’s employed a documentary crew to give the full behind the scenes look at how it’s done; from picking a final girl, to laying out all the murder weapons and traps. Starring Nathan Baesal as Leslie and Angela Goethals as the journalist trying to make her name with his story, Behind the Mask is one of the smartest modern slashers, filled with plenty of fun, blood, and horror cameos.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Leslie Vernon in the Fog


34. Sorority Row (2009)

Community choice by Philip Rogers@rogersphilip101

I agree that most slasher remakes often do little to improve on the original, there are always exceptions to the rules, and for me Sorority House is one that exceeds its predecessor. Whilst maintaining the horror tropes you would expect with a familiar set up of a prank gone wrong, the 2009 remake of The House on Sorority Row excels by really developing both the characters and the story. Building up the tension throughout it also delivers some imaginative and violent kills, the bottle scene in particular is still one of my favourites. It is no surprise that co-writers Josh Stolberg and Pete Goldfinger have continued to prove themselves naturals when it comes to imaginative kills working together on Piranha 3D, Jigsaw and most recently Spiral: From the Book of Saw. If your still not sold, amongst the talented cast is Carrie Fisher who crosses genres and is on form as the house mother Mrs. Crenshaw.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Sorority Row 2009


35. Pieces (1982)

Community choice by Metal Maniaxe@Chapelflames

My choice for favourite slasher flick is the 1984 Spanish masterpiece called Pieces, also known as Night Has 1000 Screams in its country of origin. The tagline for the film (and one of my favourites in horror history) is “You don’t have to go to Texas for a chainsaw massacre” and it definitely delivers on this fact, within the first 15 minutes we have matricide, dismemberment and an unexpected chainsaw decapitation that is just glorious. The killers M.O.? Cutting his female victims into pieces so that he may assemble his perfect woman in the same fashion one would do a jigsaw puzzle. We get dismemberment galore in this flick and kills in places like a swimming pool, elevator, a waterbed and a couple other non conventional spots which is greatly entertaining and just a breath of fresh air to the other boring paint by numbers slashers out there. The twist is definitely out of left field as well, and up until the last minutes of the film you truly have no idea what the f–k is going on.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Pieces 1982


36. Chopping Mall (1986)

Community choice by Keegan Hughes@fearfulfreq

For a movie called Chopping Mall, there really isn’t a whole lot of chopping. This lack of chop is in no way detrimental to the overall experience, though, because instead of axe-wielding maniacs we get insane killer robots rampaging through a shopping mall in the 80’s! And really, what more can you ask of a horror movie? Who among us hasn’t dreamed of using an empty mall as their own personal weapons rack while fighting off some ridiculous threat with their friends? If a movie can bring that fantasy to life it doesn’t need to do much else. Heads blow up! Propane tanks are used as improvised explosive devices. A paint store is blasted sky-high! Plus, Barbara Crampton and Kelli Maroney work together at the sleaziest mall restaurant imaginable for the greasiest chef to ever grace the big screen. Chopping Mall delivers on all counts: blood, guts, explosions, robots, and classic 80’s cheese. The only thing that could make it better is if the two snide store owners from the opening scene got what was coming to them: a face-off with the Killbots. Have a nice day.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Chopping Mall 1986


37. Silent Night, Deadly Night: Part 2 (1987)

Community choice by TJ@tjsquishface

You may be asking: Why choose the sequel when the original is a Christmas slasher classic? Well this is because Silent Night, Deadly Night: Part 2 revisits all of the important parts in the original movie, while also giving you bonus kill scenes. It’s a Christmas miracle!

Ricky isn’t a fan of much, except Jennifer, garbage day, and overly expressing himself with his eyebrows. This movie is dedicated to spending time in his shoes. Highlights include electrocution by a car battery, umbrella impalement, being disciplined by Mother Superior, and being naughty. The perfect slasher film for your December!

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Silent Night Deadly Night 2 1987


38. Unhinged (1982)

Community choice by Andy Roberts @RacketyEsperus

Released in the swell of slasher films during the Golden Age, Don Gronquist’s underrated and bleak horror Unhinged often slips through the cracks in slasher discussions. Teenagers Terri, Nancy and Gloria are on their way to a concert, only to have an accident with their car en route. Recovering from unconsciousness, they find themselves in the isolated home of the spiteful androgynistic Mrs. Penrose and her long-suffering spinster daughter Marion. Initially deciding to recuperate from their ordeal, it soon becomes fairly obvious that the Penrose home is not as safe as it looks and the girls formulate a plan to reach help beyond the thick woodlands, but a mysterious figure in a raincoat and a plethora of garden implements has other ideas. Taking inspiration from the works of Hitchcock, Unhinged is a particularly moody and gloomy experience with a strikingly surprising ending that renders this grim splatter worthy of attention.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. DVD RIGHT HERE!

Unhinged 1982


39. Cold Prey (2006)

Community choice by Joseph@Joe13Monster

Do you like your slashers foreign with an exotic locale? Then you’ve come to the right place. Released in 2006, this Nordic slasher offers a unique snowy setting and chilling tone for bloodshed to commence. Cold Prey follows a group of five friends on a snowboarding trip to an isolated mountainous region in Norway. After an accident forces them to seek shelter in an abandoned ski lodge, they soon find out the lodge harbors dark secrets, the most menacing among them being a deranged pickaxe-wielding killer. While familiar slasher tropes are present, they are heightened by the winter setting, with the harsh climate serving as much of an adversary as the killer. Coming in at 97 minutes, this film pulls no punches, offering a straight-forward, violent, and tense ride.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Cold Prey 2006


40. Tucker and Dale vs. Evil (2010)

Community choice by Lucia Zelenia – @LuciaZelenia

Tucker and Dale vs. Evil is what I consider to be an anti-slasher. It leans into the tropes we all know and love, while turning them on their heads any chance they get. This is a movie I have frequently screened for people that “aren’t really into horror,” and they end up loving it. It’s the best meta-horror flick since the original Scream, with plenty of memorable deaths to boot. In many respects, it is a gateway drug, a gentle coaxing into the genre for those that may not be sure about it, while being plenty enjoyable for a seasoned gorehound.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Tucker and Dale vs. Evil 2010 Image


41. Blood Lake (1987)

Community choice by Andy J. Davis @RealAndyDavis

Blood Lake is a shot on video (SOV) slasher that was directed by Tim Boggs in, sadly, his only directing credit. Boggs would go on to become an award-winning sound editor and work on such series as “Breaking Bad” and “The Sopranos”. The plot is a familiar one; six friends go on a weekend getaway to a lake house, where a killer is running loose!

Shot in Oklahoma and featuring several actors and actresses in the first (and only) film roles, Li’l Tony (played by Travis Krasser) is definitely the star of the show with his wisecracking remarks. Despite prolonged water skiing and quarters scenes, Blood Lake has a certain nostalgia to it and is a fun watch, as long as you don’t set your expectations too high. A truly ‘80s soundtrack by the band Voyager adds to the experience.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. DVD RIGHT HERE!

Blood Lake 1987


42. Peeping Tom (1960)

Community choice by David Bamford@DavidBamf0rd

If you love slashers, look no further than Peeping Tom. Mark Lewis is a shy and quiet focus puller and amateur filmmaker who moonlights as a serial killer, filming the deaths of his victims for a documentary he is making about fear. When he befriends the woman in the apartment downstairs, his nocturnal activities and personal life become dangerously entangled.

Widely and harshly criticised on its release, the film was banned in Finland until the 80s and received only limited release elsewhere, effectively ruining director Michael Powell’s career. Ironically it is now seen as one of the best horror films ever made, its central themes of voyeurism and criminal psychology celebrated by contemporary critics. While the death scenes are tame by modern standards, Peeping Tom does contain some genuinely shocking moments guaranteed to leave you on the edge of your seat. Highly recommended.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Peeping Tom 1960


43. Bloody Moon (1981)

Community choice by Andy Roberts @RacketyEsperus

Hailing from Spain, this Euro shocker comes to us directly from the infamous Jesús Franco, one of the most prolific Spanish directors in the industry. With a unique blend of Euro sleaze, American slasher tropes and a few sprinkles of the Italian giallo, Franco’s splatter epic focuses on a language school in Costa Del Sol, where the murder of a partygoer by the crazed Miguel led to him being institutionalised. Upon his return to the care of his sister Manuela, a new gaggle of students led by the beautiful Angela are being stalked by a savage killer intent on making them his new prey. With a whole cast of suspects including the promiscuous gardener, the blue-eyed teacher or even the wheelchair-bound countess, Bloody Moon’s charmingly ludicrous dialogue, zany character decisions and hilariously gruesome kills make this the European slasher you never thought you needed.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Bloody Moon 1981


44. Offerings (1989)

Community choice by Andy J. Davis@RealAndyDavis

Offerings is a slasher film that doesn’t try to hide the fact that it is a blatant rip-off of John Carpenter’s Halloween (1978). From the escaped mental patient hell-bent on revenge right down to the creepy piano music, which is almost stolen note-for-note from Carpenter. Offerings was written and directed by Christopher Reynolds, who would go on to write/direct exactly one other film (1992’s Lethal Justice).

Shot in Oklahoma and featuring Loretta Leigh Bowman in her first (and only) film role, Offerings is more reminiscent of a student film than a feature film (Reynolds graduated from the University of Oklahoma’s film program and the movie features a number of OU students and alumni). Despite its shortcomings, the movie provides some interesting kills and is actually quite fun to watch. If you’re in the mood for a fun slasher, filmed on a shoestring budget, check out Offerings!

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Offerings 1989


45. Friday the 13th: Part III (1982)

Community choice by Mark Wheaton@Mark_Wheaton

While the original Friday the 13th gets the lion’s share of the credit for establishing the ground rules of Hollywood’s quintessential stalk-and-slash franchise, what the series would evolve into all comes together in Steve Miner’s Friday the 13th: Part 3, arguably the model for the Jason-centric sequels to come. Part of this is because of the introduction of the Jason’s hockey mask which became the series trademark (as well as its iconic ax notch, driven in by final girl, Chris), but also the brutality and variety of the near-constant kills, the setups and executions of which taking precedence over a bare bones plot. With the highest body count of the series up until then, the bloodshed arrives via pitchfork, knitting needle, meat cleaver, hot poker, harpoon gun (used in one of the franchise’s greatest, best lit, why-sneak-around-when-you’re-the-big-bad-monster? murders—also the kill that best utilizes the film’s oft-gimmicky 3-D), and, naturally, more than one death by machete, including a man bisected while doing a handstand. Though PART 2’s final girl, Ginny Field, was originally meant to return in 3, the actress’s unavailability helped establish the franchise’s template of serving up a new, unrelated batch of victims (aside from Tommy Jarvis recurring in PARTS 4-6) with each entry, unlike other long-running slasher franchises that would bring survivors into the next movies to motivate the slasher into tying up unfinished business. Friday the 13th: Part 3 proves that one doesn’t have to be a relative or an earlier film’s final girl to prompt Jason into a new round of killing. All you have to be is handy.

(Full disclosure, I was one of the screenwriters of Friday the 13th (2009) and will always argue that F13 is the best slasher franchise!)

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Friday the 13th Part III Jason Creeping


46. Curtains (1983)

Community choice by Daniel S. Liuzzi of Horrorfuel.com

Directed by Richard Ciupka and Peter R. Simpson, this Canadian slasher tells the story of a famous director (John Vernon) holding auditions at his remote home for his upcoming film “Audra” a group of actresses arrive at the house and soon start dropping like flies! The film features the creepiest looking masked killer that’s referred to just as “The Hag” as the mask is the stuff of fever dreams! Think of it as Michael Myers’s mask left next to a heater and didn’t get a haircut. What sets the Hag apart from other masked killers is brazen in broad daylight killing style where she is right in the open confirmed in the film’s most recognizable scene of the Hag ice skating with a sickle! I’ve seen many masked slasher films but no killer creeped me the hell out more than The Hag from Curtains!

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Curtains 1983


47. Wes Craven’s New Nightmare (1994)

Community choice by Joanna Bolouri @scribbles78

The seventh and arguably one of the best films in the remarkably long and increasingly pointless Freddy franchise. Wes Craven’s New Nightmare resuscitates a previously dead Fred to battle once again with Heather Langenkamp, playing a fictional version of herself ten years after being cast as Nancy in the original Nightmare on Elm Street. Plagued by prank phone calls and bad dreams, Langenkamp isn’t the only one who’s being real life tormented by Freddy. Her Danny Torrance looking offspring, Dylan has started speaking in a really, irritating voice, Robert Englund is making bad meta Freddy fan art and Wes Craven has gone all Lin Shaye, spouting that his films have summoned an entity and only ‘Nancy’ can defeat it. With some nice throwbacks to the original, New Nightmare flips between reality and dream world effectively, giving Freddy a new and improved knife hand where even the stuffed toys are fair game. RIP Rex.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Wes Craven’s New Nightmare 1994


48. Hellbent (2004)

Community choice by Carmine Menna@vicious_boy89

Starting off with a cruising scene, this movie tries to warn you of the dangers of just that, featuring a shirtless killer dressed as the Devil, that hunts men looking for a hook-up. It immediately cuts off to a group of friends, Eddie, Joey, Chaz and Tobey, going to a West Hollywood halloween festival and they meet the killer who starts picking them off. Eddie meets a guy called Jake, and they hit it off right away, but can they get away from the clutches of this serial killer? Eventually there’s a weird reveal about Eddie (that’s kind of hilarious in my opinion), you never get to know the killer’s identity (or get to see his face for that matter), but that doesn’t detract from the fun of it.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. DVD RIGHT HERE!

Hellbent 2004


49. The Strangers: Prey at Night (2018)

Community choice by Luke Leverett – @LukeLeverett

Johannes Roberts takes the bare bones of Bryan Bertino’s intimate home invasion flick The Strangers and expands them into a contemporary slasher classic that is more than a mere sequel. An empty trailer park becomes a macabre playground for a mysterious trio of killers as they spook, lure, manipulate, and attack a family that just happens to be right in the middle of their “teen daughter rebellious phase” crisis. The economy of storytelling, casual exposition, the genuine portrayals of a pretty good family having an increasingly bad night, and the slick filmmaking of Johannes Roberts make this such an easy-to-watch, straightforward slasher that when The Pool Scene hits, it hits hard, making a colorful pop-opera explosion that thrills so well it overshadows just how solidly built the whole film is.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

The Strangers Prey at Night Man in the Mask


50. Child’s Play (1988)

Community choice by Mal Jutley@maljutley

Child’s Play is a fantastically brutal slasher. Quick Overview: Andy is given a Good Guys Doll doll as his birthday present, unbeknown to him him, a serial killer by the name of Charles Lee Ray has preformed a voodoo spell and transferred his soul into one of the drills after he is chased into a toy shop. There is an explosion in the toy shop and all that survives is the detective that was chasing Charles, Charles dead body and the doll he transferred his soul into. Andy’s mum is Karen, who purchases the doll from a homeless guy, which is now known as Chucky and gives it to her son Andy as the birthday present…and so the fun begins!

We know that Chucky is the evil doll in Andy’s life and that he tells Andy to do bad things and of course Chucky kills the people around him. However the thing that makes Chucky a brilliant slasher is two things. 1 that it does everything from the point of view of a child or a child’s doll (toy’s always work well in horror films, they tap into out own childhood memories and mess with us) and 2 unlike most slasher films, we know who the killer is. Pretty much from the off we know Chucky is the killer. Throughout the film we know where Chucky is, the victims just have to outsmart Chucky. In most slasher films, part of the dread is not knowing where the killer will striker from, who it is or what to expect. Chucky is the opposite of all that. What then takes this to a whole new level is that the Chucky doll didn’t look evil, it was cute and a toy a kid would want. Don Mancini created a wise cracking, foul mouthed serial killer doll and we lapped it up. The babysitter kill with the hammer, the explosion at Eddie’s house and the set up fo Andy being involved really flipped the usual adult killer and stalker style slasher movies we had seen before. Chucky is a despicable character but played a doll really made this a unique watch where despite seeming at times, predictable it has enough twists and turn to keep the us engaged. Add to this the use of manly animatronics and cosmetics (or child actors as needed) and on screen we had a believe actual doll doing the killing all the while setting up Andy.

Child’s Play is a high energy slasher, the plot is simple but effective but what works is that through this first film we actually didn’t know what to expect. Even the way Chucky is killed at the end its takes a few attempts and it’s almost comedic in that he gets burned, shot, shot again and we see Chucky perform torture…all this from a doll! I remember the adverts and promo for this film and it was different to a see cute looking doll at the centre of all the killings. Chucky is one off my favourite slasher films simply because it flipped the slasher genre enough for use to enjoy it differently to the likes of Halloween, Friday the 13th etc and who didn’t want a Chucky Doll growing up as a kid!

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Child's Play 1988 Andy on Floor


51. Trick ‘r Treat (2007)

Community choice by Mark@T20Mark

Trick ‘r Treat goes down on my list as one of the all time greats in the horror genre. A genre which is often dominated by so many late 70’s/80’s movies, but this little fun flick from the 21st century certainly holds its own in that regard. The stunning visuals director Michael Dougherty captures & the whole Halloween feel to the film are mesmerising. Add to that the clever little interwoven stories which blend together as the movie reaches its penultimate finale are way ahead of its time. We are also spoiled by some great casting choices (Anna Paquin, Dylan Baker & Quinn Lord) to name a few. The latter of them being “Quinn Lord” who portrays our main character Sam, the cute little burlap sacked demonic pumpkin. He appears almost child like in the film but don’t mistake his subtle appearance as we find out his intentions early on in the film anyone found to be breaking Halloween rules and traditions are met with a grisly outcome. The main 3 rules being always giving out candy to trick or treaters, dressing up for the occasion, and never, ever blow out your Jack O’Lantern before midnight. By following these simple steps you should consider yourself safe! Couple All of these ingredients with great special effects, fantastic photography and a fresh inventive script you can rest assured this will be a classic that is watched every year around Halloween season. It’s no surprise the film has developed such a cult following and the character Sam has achieved such popularity in the pop culture society. And remember: ALWAYS CHECK YOUR CANDY!

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Trick 'r Treat Sam with Pumpkin


52. Scream (1996)

Community choice by Kyle Prescott@kylesprescott

This movie is the best slasher film of all time, in my opinion. Scream rejuvenated the slasher genre like no other and made way for many great films afterwards that were inspired by what Scream did for the genre. From the unique meta mind games that the killer(s) put the victims through to the mystery of trying to figure out who was behind the killings, everything about this film is perfect.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Scream 1996 Ghostface Mask


53. Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter (1984)

Community choice by Josh Ellis@scouse_91

Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter is, arguably, the definitive slasher movie. Halloween will always be the Godfather of slasher movies, there’s no arguing with that. But when we visualize a slasher movie, we always think of Jason Voorhees. The Final Chapter is the most atmospheric in the franchise and was the last time the franchise tried to be scary. A new horror icon was found in Tommy Jarvis and we got some great performances from the supporting cast. If you haven’t seen The Final Chapter yet, C’mon, don’t be a dead f–k…

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Friday The 13th The Final Chapter 1984


54. Terrifier (2016)

Community choice by Chelsea Rose@chelsea_burnham

Don’t let the fact that Terrifier is an independently produced film that is new to the slasher game dissuade you from believing that it has more than earned its place on this list. In a world where scary clowns have been done to death, and then some, director Damien Leone has gifted us with a new villain that makes Pennywise look like Ronald McDonald. Art the Clown is ruthless and presents us with gruesome and creative death scenes that would make even a seasoned horror lover unable to look at a hand saw in the same manner ever again. He kills almost artistically, with no rhyme or reason to his madness other than doing what he wants without any discrimination. Terrifier goes a step further by kicking the age-old tradition of a classic final girl to the curb by taking the initial female lead off of the table halfway through and replacing her. In fact, Art appears to kick away many of the traditions commonly seen in classic slasher films even through the use of methods that could be considered cheating in order to ensure his victory. With a sequel already in production, it is safe to say that Art is on his way to becoming one of the most notable figures in the slasher genre.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Terrifier Art With Sack


55. Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives (1986)

Community choice by Bill Reick@billreick

By the time the franchise reached its 6th installment in 1986, ​Friday the 13th​’s Jason Voorhees was not only a bankable box office draw, but also a household name in league with Dracula, The Wolfman and… ​Frankenstein​. So, it’s no mistake that with this story, ​Part VI​-director Tom McLoughlin chose to harken back to the mad science of Universal’s 1931 classic. We link back up with Tommy Jarvis, from ​Part IV ​and ​V​, on his way to ensure beyond all doubt that Jason is permanently laid in his final resting place. Overcome by visions of Jason’s destruction, Tommy digs him up and drives a metal fence post through Jason’s corpse. Lightning strikes, Jason is reanimated, and mayhem ensues. What follows is the most ​purely​ entertaining film in the franchise, with gags, great kills and plenty of Boris Karloff references. Friday the 13th parts 1 through 5 all treat their villain as a masked slasher. With ​Part VI​, Jason is elevated from camp-counselor-killer to full-blown monster movie icon. Godzilla, King Kong, Jason Voorhees.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Friday the 13th Part VI Jason Lives Hockey Mask


56. Slumber Party Massacre (1987)

Community choice by TJ@tjsquishface

A denim loving psycho with a cordless drill and a GMC van on the loose. Luckily, Trish, the lead, is throwing a slumber party the same weekend. The scene is set for Slumber Party Massacre!

This is one of the first slasher movies I saw and it helped define the genre for me: large quantities of death scenes, jump scares, teenage debauchery, and that sweet synth sound. Slumber Party Massacre is a slasher classic. If you have not seen it, please do yourself the favour and buy or rent it.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

Slumber Party Massacre 1982


57. The Dorm That Dripped Blood (1982)

Community choice by Andy Roberts @RacketyEsperus

Alternatively known as Pranks and Death Dorm, Jeffrey Obrow’s and Stephen Carpenter’s The Dorm That Dripped Blood is a 1982 entry into the slasher cycle, written when the pair were still film students. Set over the Christmas holidays, a handful of students volunteer to sort through the inventory of their dormitory building, which is due to be demolished in the new year. Though initially the operation runs smoothly, the students soon notice that an intruder is on the premises, causing noises, stealing tools and even vandalising their property. The stranger’s wanton tricks however begin to develop into something much more serious, when the teens find themselves being slain one by one. Boasting some terrific deaths including a spiked bat to the head, a drill to the skull and even being boiled in an industrial cooking pot, Dorm is a frequently overlooked but incredibly fun slasher film for your library.

Buy the UK DVD RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

The Dorm That Dripped Blood 1982


58. The Boogeyman (1980)

Community choice by Andy Roberts @RacketyEsperus

Melding the aesthetics of European horror with contemporary ‘80s slasher films, Ulli Lommel’s supernatural splatter film showcases the iconic POV shots of Halloween, the diabolic hauntings of The Exorcist and the fatal machinations later popularised by the Final Destination series. After a traumatic childhood, siblings Lacey and Willie have settled into a rustic lifestyle living with a farming family. After a nostalgic letter from their mother, Lacey returns to her childhood home to put some demons to rest, where her brother Willie had murdered their mother’s abusive boyfriend many decades earlier. Spying the boyfriend’s spectre in a mirror, Lacey shatters it and unleashes an evil presence which stalks and kills anyone unlucky enough to be in proximity to the shards. With an atmospheric rural setting, gloriously synth soundtrack and a catalogue of ghostly murder set pieces, The Boogeyman is a must-see for any ‘80s slasher fan.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. DVD RIGHT HERE!

The Boogeyman 1980


59. Cold Prey 2 (2008)

Community choice by Joseph@Joe13Monster

Cold Prey 2 takes place immediately after the events of the first film, following our final girl Jannicke as she is terrorized yet again by the pickaxe-wielding killer. Fans of the Halloween franchise will enjoy this entry, as this sequel wears its direct influences from Halloween 2 proudly, complete with an eerie hospital setting. Yet with these influences, this snow-set slasher stands entirely on its own by doubling down on the cold, chilly tone of the first with more entertaining kills and not just one, but two final girls. Released in 2008, this continuation gifts us with a modern slasher franchise from Norway to add to our watchlists when we are in the mood for some snow-bound murder and mayhem.

Cold Prey 2 2008


60. Scream 2 (1997)

Community choice by Kim Morrison@wickedsister69

A mere year after Scream hit out screens and changed the world of slasher movies forever, we were treated to the second instalment of the franchise – Scream 2. Scream 2 is a rare example of a sequel that stands proudly beside its predecessor. It gave us more kills, new killers, and additions to the rules we all hold so dear, all of which are proof that the Scream series is one that deserves its legacy.

Scream 2 1997


61. Urban Legend (1998)

Community choice by Joe Croft@JoeNepa88

Urban Legend is a slasher from the post-Scream era that doesn’t get the credit it deserves. Jamie Blanks crafted a tight, reference-heavy mystery with an intriguing back story for Natalie (played beautifully by Alicia Witt). It also features two of the most important elements of any good slasher: a great opening sequence (Brad Dourif being creepy as hell) and a nice chase scene (possibly Tara Reid’s finest hour). Throw in a great ensemble featuring a standout Loretta Devine and Robert freaking Englund, and you’ve got a cozy, late 90s treat. You’ll never look at a Noxzema commercial the same way again.

Urban Legend 1998 Axe


62. Tower Block (2012)

Community choice by The Grump of Horror@Grump_Horror

Slasher films tend to follow a number of cliches. Often there is a past event that the killer is out for revenge for. Usually the character gather in a remote location, where help is unlikely to arrive. Often the killer uses a sharp blade of some kind. Tower Block, made in 2012, has most of these cliches. with one difference, the killer uses a gun. The characters/potential victims are trapped on the top floor of a tower block, as the killer picks them off one by one. The writer, James Moran, develops the story well, writing his characters very well, building tension between them, that the cast headed by Sheridan Smith, Jack O’Connell, Ralph Brown and Russell Tovey bring to life brilliantly. Directors David Beton (under the name Ronnie Thompson) and James Nunn don’t go for jump scares, but instead build on that tension and also pull of surprising deaths well. It’s a terrific thriller, one that knows what type of film it is and delivers on the story, right up to the end. What Tower Block shows is that not all slasher films need to follow the usual format.

Tower Block 2012


63. Happy Death Day (2017) 

Community choice by Mal Jutley@maljutley

So imagine Groundhog Day but instead of making the most of the day you have to find out who a serial killer is? Well that’s a broad overview of Happy Death Day. Theresa or ‘Tree’ Gelbman wakes up after a drunken night and plays out a pretty much standard hungover morning, demises her friends, ignores calls, throws away an all important cupcake and meets up with a professor she is having an affair with . Atg another party that night she is lured into a tunnel and is murdered by someone who is wearing the mask of the school mascot. Normally this is the film, she wasn’t the final girl, except, she wakes up the next day in bed and finds everything happening all overall. She’s stuck in a time loop. As the film progresses she learns each time she dies she wakes up again and each day repeats itself. The same events occur but in doing so she uses the time loop to discover the identity of the killer. However each time she dies in varying ways she retains damage from each death.

The film carries on this manner and without going into a scene by scene overview what we find is the clever way this film is written and how much of a satire on the teen slasher / sorority / campus style of films it pokes fun at. What it does really well is challenge you to watch a slasher from the point of view of you knowing what’s happening but show you different ways the same thing can happen (like most slashers) The film then plays along the college horror tropes and when the killer is revealed it stick to formula (I won’t revel if any haven’t seen it).

When we find out that Tree has to get herself killed each day, piece together the events of the day to outwit the killer, we find ourselves in familiar slasher territory luring a killer into traps, putting together pieces of the jigsaw to finds out who the killer is, but in a twist, Tree has to get killed each time to repeat the day and learn new things. This is where Happy Death Day excels, it keeps us in familiar surroundings while introducing a whole new take on how a slasher plays out. The other characters in the film play to type (a love interest that she doesn’t have an interest in, an annoying roommate, Tree herself being a not very likeable person) but they help build the story. The setting is very familiar to Scream for me in terms of the college setting and set of friends and of course we have a masked killer which turns up in most slashers. It’s a fun film, it’s certainly one to watch with friends or part of a movie night or with friends or as the current climate suggests, in a drive in!

Happy Death Day 2017


64. Scream 3 (2000)

Community choice by Allison Reagan@AllisonJReagan

No one places this movie at the top of any “favorites” list, but the much-derided sequel of a horror favorite holds a special place in the slasher canon. In keeping with the Scream series, Scream 3 plays on the rules of the trilogy, and lures continuing characters to Hollywood for the murderous filming of Stab 3. Scream 3 was made more cartoonish than the rest of the series due to its release in the wake of the Columbine Massacre. But its sinister undercurrent anticipates the #MeToo movement, especially as it pertains to Hollywood, and thematically centers the hot button issue of generational trauma. The definite oddball of the series, Scream 3 is the nexus of its moment and the forthcoming hot topics it touches on.

Scream 3 2000


65. Green Room (2015)

Community choice by Keegan Hughes@fearfulfreq

Far from a traditional slasher, Jeremy Saulnier’s Green Room grabs you by the throat and throws you into the action. Here’s the premise: four members of a punk band, the Ain’t Rights, witnesses a murder at a backwoods Nazi bar and have to fight to survive the night. Pretty wicked, right? Well, wicked doesn’t even begin to describe the brutal mayhem. Not for the faint of heart, this bloodbath foregoes the usual over-the-top slasher kills for some truly vicious, callous murders. There is no big, supernatural bad guy. Instead there’s a bunch of bloodthirsty, red-shoelaced skinheads with ice in their veins. Really and truly, it’s kill or be killed. Top-notch cinematography and production design round out the excellent performances given by the likes of Anton Yelchin, Alia Shawkat, and incredibly, Patrick Stewart. For the punk-fuelled massacre of your nightmares, there’s no better flick.

Green Room 2015


66. Sleepaway Camp (1983)

Community choice by Joanna Bolouri @scribbles78

Eight years after surviving a boating accident which killed her brother, traumatised introvert Angela is sent to Camp Arawak with her cousin Ricky to spend the Summer engaging in teenage activities, which include, awkward flirting, hairspray abuse and an abundance of overacting. But it’s the eighties and there’s always a murderer running around nature areas, so naturally everyone gets picked off one by one until the murderer is revealed in one of the most iconic and unsettling endings ever. Directed by Robert Hiltzik, Sleepaway Camp isn’t the scariest slasher from the decade but from the creepy pedo chef to the horrendous use of curling irons during a kill, it’s definitely one of the most memorable.

Sleepaway Camp 1983


67. Slaughter High (1986)

Community choice by TJ @tjsquishface

A group of middle-aged high school kids bully poor Marty to the point of disfigurement. Fast forward 10 years to a reunion and we are ready for the 1986 slasher cult classic: Slaughter High.

Like most good slasher movies, there are jump scares, beer drinking, and pot smoking. What differentiates this movie from the others are the kill scenes. Marty was a thought leader in this space. Highlights include acid baths, exploding guts, electrifying orgasms, and more! Slaughter High is a requirement for any slasher movie enthusiast. Finally, don’t place glass bottles of nitric acid on the top shelf. Ever.

Slaughter High 1986


68. Savage Weekend (1979)

Community choice by Andy Roberts @RacketyEsperus

Though filmed before John Carpenter’s Halloween, David Paulsen’s upstate New York murder mystery Savage Weekend wasn’t released until 1980 where it was quickly engulfed by contemporaneous slasher flicks. After a messy divorce, Marie joins her sister Shirley, new boyfriend Robert and their gay buddy Nicky on a country trip to a newly purchased farmhouse. With local lumberjack Mac taking an interest in Marie and former farmhouse owner Otis rumoured to be responsible for a past murder, it’s unsurprising that a masked maniac also becomes attracted to the vacationers, planning elaborate and gruesome ends to befall the innocent holidaymakers. But just who is the man behind the sinister mask? Eschewing the traditional teenage cast, Paulsen’s potboiler actually has a complex interweaving of character motivations, tense stalk ‘n’ slash sequences, a mature exploration of adult sexuality and some brilliant murder set pieces, all in one slick proto-slasher package.

Savage Weekend 1979


69. Student Bodies (1981)

Community choice by David Hildebrand – @Sycotic

Student Bodies crashed and burned at the box office but became a cult classic thanks to multiple appearances on USA Up All Night, a late-night program dedicated to showing B-rate movies. The story focuses on the mysterious serial killer named The Breather who stalks students at Lamab High School. And of course, he hates when the teens have sex.

However, this isn’t your typical slasher. Student Bodies is the first film to ever parody slasher films. Referencing Friday the 13th, When a Stranger Calls, and Halloween. The Breather doesn’t use the standard weapons such as a knife or chainsaw. He gets more creative and breaks out chalkboard erasers, paper clips, and even a horsehead bookend. Throw in the comedic body count that visually appears after each death and you have a quality comedic slasher film that even manages to throw in a few twists!

Student Bodies 1981


70. Slumber Party Massacre 2 (1987)

Community choice by Allison Reagan@AllisonJReagan

Not much of Slumber Party Massacre 2 makes sense… unless you’re a woman. On a weekend getaway, the sole survivor of the first Slumber Party Massacre and her friends are targeted by a rockabilly Freddy Kruger-type wielding a guitar-drill. The indisputable heart of the movie, though, is the group of girlfriends. Even after boyfriends and crushes are introduced, the girls’ friendship remains the strongest relationship of the movie. It’s not often that an 80’s slasher passes the Bechdel test, but this woman-directed film does with flying colors. Is the rockabilly driller killer real? Where did he come from and why? Is this movie technically a musical? Who knows! But this messiness highlights by contrast the bonds between fully fleshed out female characters, characters who would simply be wood for the woodchipper in any other slasher.

Slumber Party Massacre 2 1987


71. Amsterdamned (1988)

Community choice by Robert Jennings@timelordbob1

Amsterdamned is a Dutch serial killer film from director Dick Maas. A killer is using the canals of Amsterdam to stalk and kill his victims. A fantastic speedboat chase and an atmospheric score from Maas the Dutch answer to John Carpenter make this film an interesting watch.

Amsterdamned 1988


72. Child’s Play 2 (1990)

Community choice by Derek Sykes @DerekSykes17

Whereas the original Child’s Play plays more like a psychological thriller, the sequel moves into full slasher territory. Chucky is brought back due to corporate greed, and begins his hunt for Andy Barclay. Our child hero finds himself in the care of foster parents Phil and Joanne Simpson, and forms a tenuous bond with foster sister Kyle. Chucky eventually makes his way into the foster home, and kills all of the adults who are failing to take care of Andy (his teacher, his parents, and a child services agent). Kyle and Andy defeat Chucky by working together, and together learn that they can’t depend on adults to save them. This powerful lesson is one the original series will never reach (nor ever attempt to reach) again, and stands out among the slashers of it’s time for the care it takes with its story and characters.

Child's Play 2 Good Guy Doll


73. Night Warning (1982)

Community choice by Andy Roberts @RacketyEsperus

Vastly underrated and often lost among the tides of early ‘80s slashers, this steadily building exercise in hysterical murder is from I Love Lucy director William Asher. Nominated for the Saturn Award for Best Horror Movie of 1982, this shocker is centred on the tale of Billy Lynch, a young high school senior who lives with his dotty aunt Cheryl since his parents were killed in a car accident. With a tempting scholarship and the chance to move away with his girlfriend within reach, Cheryl begins to act increasingly suspicious, culminating in her murdering a local TV repairman. When a prejudiced detective is assigned to the case, his focus on Billy only allows Cheryl’s homicidal urges to fester rapidly out of control. With more than a touch of Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?, this mature exploration of homophobic bigotry and familial dysfunction ranks highly amongst its contemporaries.

Night Warning 1981


74. Tourist Trap (1979)

Community choice by Kim Morrison@wickedsister69

Nothing can quite prepare you for the strange 90-minute ride that is Tourist Trap, but it definitely deserves recognition alongside more conventional slashers. What starts as a typical ‘oh no the car has broken down, let’s head to this creepy gas station for help’ situation, quickly turns into a fight for survival against a telekinetic killer who also has a talent for turning people into wax mannequins. Tourist Trap is a beautiful mix of scary and hilarious, with possibly one of the most perfect final shots ever.

Tourist Trap 1979


75. Hatchet (2006)

Community choice by Lucia Zelenia@LuciaZelenia

Hatchet is as over the top, balls-out as slashers get. It serves as a love letter to the classics, all while involving legends such as Tony Todd, Danielle Harris, and Kane Hodder to tell the story of Victor Crowley. The kills are as memorable as they come, with gore so ridiculous, one can’t help but chuckle through slack jaw. The universe surrounding Honey Island Swamp has only improved with time and sequels, but if you’re looking for a modern slasher, Hatchet is the way to go.

Long live Victor Crowley, and long live practical effects!

Hatchet 2006


76. 555 (1986)

Community choice by TJ @tjsquishface

Have you ever bought or rented a movie because the cover was awesome? That’s how 555 roped me in. But it was the sleaziness, foul-mouthed script, and over the top acting that won me over.

555 is a 1988 SOV treasure that follows ill tempered detectives and a reporter trying to stop a serial killing hippie. The movie features plenty of murders, filthy movie sets, hilariously awkward sex scenes, boom mic surprises, a gnarly decapitation, and a gratuitous recap of all the murders just in case you missed them the first time. 555 embraces the sleazebag in all of us.

555 1988


77. Scream 4 (2011)

Community choice by Scott Dean@ScottyReading

Scream 4 is a killer of a slasher film and could be one of my favorite sequels for a slasher, even more enjoyable than Wes Craven’s New Nightmare (which is a firm favorite). The Whole concept of the film was too ahead of its time, too clever for some audiences who I believe to be decent for a Scream film… One’s I am bothered about. Just for Kirby. Sidney, Dewey and Gale are survivors like no other in the slasher world, a trio that lives on. Scream 4 belongs in the hall of top 100 slasher films for its meta references (even if the characters don’t quite get them), the kills are gory and fresh with an opening sequence that brings about laughs, horror, gore and of course screams.

Scream 4 2011


78. Bride of Chucky (1998)

Community choice by Chelsea Rose@chelsea_burnham

Part horror, part comedy, and all slasher, Bride of Chucky is a film that is still great over twenty years following its initial release. As a sequel installment to the Child’s Play franchise, it takes a bold departure from its original entry as a supernatural horror to seemingly rebrand itself as a horror comedy during a time in which meta horror was at its peak. This installment is the one that introduces us to Chucky’s former girlfriend Tiffany, who quickly steals all of our horror loving hearts before the opening credits have a chance to roll. The death toll is nearly double that of any prior installments in the franchise, proving that Chucky and Tiffany are a match made for one another. With over the top deaths that creatively range from explosions to corpses bearing an uncanny resemblance to a certain Cenobite, as well as witty dark humor, there is something to be found within this slasher for all horror fans to love.

Bride of Chucky 1998


79. Cherry Falls (2000)

Community choice by Kim Morrison@wickedsister69

Post-Scream (1996), the horror genre was hit with a wave of new and unique slasher offerings, with Cherry Falls being one of the strangest. The town of Cherry Falls sees itself hit by a killer who is targeting teen virgins as part of a revenge plot for a secret the town has tried to bury. Cherry Falls has some genuinely creepy moments, a cracking killer reveal, and its tongue firmly in its cheek, but it’s Brittany Murphy who steals the show with her amazing array of outfits.

Cherry Falls 2000


80. Edge Of The Axe (1988)

Community choice by Robert Jennings@timelordbob1

Edge Of The Axe is a Spanish late entry into the 80’s slasher genre. Directed by José Ramón Larraz of Vampyres fame it deals with a series of murders taking place in Northern California. A masked killer stalks the rural community while some of the most inept police officers in cinema history attempt to cover it up. Although set in America it was mostly filmed in Madrid which combined with the Spanish director gives the film a different flavour to most slashers. Sadly it’s a flawed film that spends far too long with the uninteresting male and female lead. A good story concept is there somewhere but a unsatisfying ending wastes what potential the story had. It’s still worth a watch but even the director considered it his weakest film.

Edge Of The Axe Mask


81. Halloween (2018)

Community choice by Kim Morrison@wickedsister69

Halloween (2018) took the brave decision, and one that the Halloween series has taken before, to rewrite the series timeline and make a direct sequel to the 1978 original. Michael has been sitting in Smith’s Grove for the past 40 years, but he manages to escape during a transfer to another facility. Meanwhile, Laurie Strode has spent the last 40 years dealing with the trauma of that night in 1978 and preparing for another showdown with Michael; one that she feels is inevitable. It’s an interesting dive into the longlasting effects the encounter had on Laurie and Michael’s unwavering commitment to finishing what he started. It’s a tad gorier than the original movie, but it’s a welcome return to the world of Haddonfield.

Halloween 2018 The Shape Stairs


82. Psycho II (1983)

Community choice by Avery McReynolds@AJMcReynolds

22 years after Hitchcock’s classic adaptation to Psycho, Vera Miles and Anthony Perkins return to their roles in what’s arguably one of the greatest horror sequels, in and out of the slasher subgenre. Norman Bates is released after successfully completing a rehabilitation program to the extent that he’s no longer considered a threat — at least to everyone other than Lila Crane (now Loomis; a survivor of Norman’s) and anyone who’s signed her petitions. I won’t spoil the plot, it’s truly a magnificent film with great direction, a neat script and a fantastic score. For those of you looking for excessive gore and creative kills, Psycho II probably isn’t what you’re looking for; though whenever anything horrific does happen, it packs a wallop that finely balances between classic and then-modern horror fare. It’s a solid horror picture with a rich history behind it that, yes, it’s respectful of.

Psycho II Shovel


83. Fade to Black (1980)

Community choice by Derek Sykes @DerekSykes17

Fade to Black is a curious little film- a shy, unassuming young cinephile named Eric (Dennis Christopher) who becomes obsessed with a woman with a striking resemblance to Marilyn Monroe (played by real-life Marilyn impersonator Linda Kerridge). As Eric becomes increasingly obsessed with Marilyn and his life begins to fall apart, he murders people while transforming himself into fictional characters, such as Dracula, The Mummy, and Hopalong Cassidy. The tragedy of Eric Binford is a compelling one, with a heartbreaking performance by Dennis Christopher at the core. Add in fun homages and an unexpected subplot about alternatives to police, Fade to Black has a lot to offer as an early 80s good time.

Fade to Black Eric


84. Blood Feast (1963)

Community choice by Andy Roberts @RacketyEsperus

Arguably the most important entry in slasher film history, Herschel Gordon Lewis’s 1963 splatterfest Blood Feast is often cited as the world’s first gore film. True to form, the film follows a caterer Fuad Ramses who is commissioned to provide the food for a local birthday celebration of the Fremont family. In reality, he is a religious zealot who worships the Egyptian idol of Ishtar, planning to recreate the sacrificial ‘blood feast’ to honour her, involving countless dismembered body parts and gallons of blood. In a prototype for what would arrive many years later, the machete-wielding maniac stalks and kills women, severing limbs, tongues, brains or just plain whipping them to death. While certainly dated by today’s standards, the film is gorier than many of its ‘80s iterations and remains as grisly as it did for ‘60s audiences.

Blood Feast 1963


85. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: Part 2 (1986)

Community choice by Derek Sykes @DerekSykes17

After a decade of silence… the buzzz is back! The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: Part 2 follows Lefty Enright, the uncle of the original film’s final girl Sally, and Stretch, a DJ for a local radio station, as they attempt to stop the murderous Sawyer clan from continuing their reign of terror in the Lone Star State. While the original film is harrowing, grimy, and relatively bloodless, Part 2 is the opposite- over the top, incredibly funny, and gory as hell. Incredible performances from Dennis Hopper, Caroline Williams and Bill Moseley solidify this rip-roaring movie as one of the all-time greatest horror comedies.

TCM Part 2


86. Visiting Hours (1982)

Community choice by Andy Roberts @RacketyEsperus

Following in the vein of Halloween II, this Canadian shocker stars Michael Ironside as the thoroughly repulsive Hawker, an intensely deranged misogynistic brute who becomes incensed at a women’s rights activist he sees on television, Deborah. Tracking her down, he viciously attacks her but is unsuccessful at landing a killing blow. When Deborah is hospitalised, Hawker stalks the hospital she is in and begins to play a sadistic game of cat and mouse, using the nurses and patients as collateral damage. Not as well known as its contemporaries, Visiting Hours is a thoroughly affecting example of the slasher genre that relies heavily on the menace and threat that Ironside’s cold and calculating performance outstandingly achieves, with a peppering of the required nastiness.

Visiting Hours 1982


87. Psycho III (1986)

Community choice by Wynn@DoctorWynn

An under valued threequel that is pure 80’s, but despite his own apparent thoughts, is well directed by Perkins, who also embraces the absurdity of reaching this point in Norman Bates career as a crazed killer by adding a darkly comedic element to proceedings. Psycho III is surprisingly stylish and features an under appreciated Carter Burwell score, (Maureen In The Desert is a class track). It also features some memorable supporting characters (Jeff Fahey’s Dwayne Duke being one. FYI – Friends just call him Duke). Being as this was made at the tail end of the slasher craze, its disappointing box office was probably the result of burn out from horror fans, as there are some fun kills here and its easily the goriest of the Psycho movies. More over though, its just a damn good fun slice of slasher horror cinema.

Anthony Perkins Psycho III


88. Valentine (2001) 

Community choice by Kim Morrison@wickedsister69

Valentine is another post-Scream slasher that wanted to add a brand-new masked killer into the world of horror. This time around it is a creepy cherub murdering a group of friends as the days tick down towards Valentine’s Day. The women soon believe the killer to be Jeremy Melton, a boy they went to junior high with who is back for revenge after being falsely accused of sexual assault by one of the group. There’s lots of lovely Valentine’s Day imagery including threatening love notes, maggot-infested chocolates, and a slightly deadlier version of Cupid’s arrow. Perfect for any Valentine’s Day haters out there.

Walentine 2001 Movie Image


89. Eyes of a Stranger (1981) 

Community choice by Andy Roberts – @RacketyEsperus

Young women are being stalked and harassed by a mysterious assailant in downtown Miami, before he brutally rapes and murders them. Television reporter Jane is vociferous in her eagerness to catch the guy herself and when she notices the odd behaviour of her neighbour Stanley Herbert, she becomes embroiled in terrible danger, putting herself and her deaf, blind and mute sister Tracy in peril. Released smack dab in the middle of the Golden Age (1981), this disturbing thriller-slasher hybrid boasts an effectively grimy and disturbing edge, wrought by effective dark stalk ‘n’ slash sequences, stellar gory effects work by Tom Savini and a range of decent performances from leads Lauren Tewes and Jennifer Jason Leigh (in her first screen role). With a Hitchcockian vibe and a thoroughly polished and slick sheen, Eyes of a Stranger is sure to surprise even the most learned of slasher aficionados.

Eyes of a Stranger 1981


90. New Year’s Evil (1980) 

Community choice by Andy Roberts – @RacketyEsperus

Since Halloween, Christmas, birthdays and all the other seasonal occasions were taken, New Year’s Evil decides to tackle the otherwise unremarkable holiday of the New Year. Diane or ‘Blaze’ is a music celebrity chosen to host a televised countdown for New Year in a Los Angeles skyscraper. The festivities are somewhat dampened when a maniacal killer dials in on live TV and lets Diane know that he will kill a woman at the stroke of midnight in each American time zone. As the killer follows through on his violent threats, Diane becomes increasingly frantic as the murderer has promised she will be his last victim as the New Year is ushered in. While certainly not as graphic or as gory as some of its contemporaries, New Year’s Evil strengths focus on its time-critical plot, an air of misogyny and a charmingly psychotic killer who we see stalk his victims in plain sight.

New Year's Evil 1980 Mask Image


91. Child’s Play (2019)

Community choice by Derek Sykes @DerekSykes17

The dreaded “remake”. It is odd that so many horror fans get defensive about remakes- honestly, many of the recent remakes have been good or even great, with several passing up the original in terms of quality (Friday the 13th, Evil Dead, The Hills Have Eyes). That is exactly what happened in 2019 with Child’s Play. The best choice this movie makes? It’s protagonist is Andy, not Chucky. Not only does this help distinguish it from the original, but it allows a deeper connection to the human characters than almost any other movie in the franchise. People are understandably upset about the behind the scenes stuff- but look past that, understand that real people worked on this movie. Forget the studio stuff and what you’ll find is a violent, exciting retelling with a lot of heart. With a killer score by Bear McCreary and great performances from Aubrey Plaza, Brian Tyree Henry, Gabriel Bateman and Mark Hamill, this movie deserves credit that some people just refuse to give it. For a movie to make Chucky sympathetic… that is undeniable power.

Child's Play 2019 Chucky


92. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003) 

Community choice by Avery McReynolds @AJMcReynolds

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre remake is an underrated gem, and despite the seemingly unanimous opinion that, “Remakes suck,” there’s very little — if anything — wrong with this one. The story is different than the source material, which works in its favor, and the acting performances and characters are fantastic across the board. Jessica Biel’s performance is especially convincing and compelling. In fact, I dare say it’s tragically overlooked not just within genre films, but in the industry altogether. I know, it sounds like I’m over-hyping this entry, but in a franchise that has more terrible sequels than terrific ones, this certainly stands out as a highlight.

Buy the UK Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE! Buy The U.S. Blu-Ray RIGHT HERE!

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2003 Leatherface


93. Terror Train (1980)

Community choice by Jessica Scott @WeWhoWalkHere

Ultimate scream queen Jamie Lee Curtis faces the consequences of a fraternity prank gone horribly wrong in this terrific Canadian slasher. Stuck on a train during a New Year’s Eve party, she must face off with a killer who switches disguises at every opportunity, keeping her and the viewer on their toes. There are plenty of surprises (including quite a bit of magic from David Copperfield, but trust me, the movie makes it work), some eerie visuals, and a satisfying ending. It’s not Jamie Lee’s most famous slasher, but it’s still a great entry in the subgenre.

Terror Train 1980 Axe


94. Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers (1988)

Community choice by Aaron @AaronTh79919330

After the failed experiment of Halloween 3: Season of the Witch, Halloween fans spoke their minds. They were not ready for something new and wanted their favorite movie monster back. After 7 years Michael Myers returned in Halloween 4 The Return of Micheal Myers. This was not an easy task. A 7 year gap and a failed sequel, this movie had its work cut out for it. Not only did fans get what they wanted, but they got a classic sequel. The intro to this film is the best in the franchise and the feel of haddonfield was back with the best cast in the franchise. Rachel, Brady, Ben Meeker were all fantastic and Loomis was back and better than ever. Many people did not care for the new mask but looking back it was the right choice for plausibility. 10 years later Michael is not going to walk into a random store and get the same mask. I mean, c’mon! Good mood and armosphere and kills. Only complaint for me was the shape himself. Michael was not the sleek gliding boogie man that he once was but more of a hulking brut. Over all this is the movie that got me involved in the franchise when I was 14 years old. 32 years later it’s still my favorite sequel.

Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers Brady and Michael


95. The Town That Dreaded Sundown (2004)

Community choice by Derek Sykes @DerekSykes17

Perhaps the most inventive movie in the wave of remakes started by 1998’s Psycho, The Town that Dreaded Sundown is not a true remake of the 1976 film. It is, all at once, a remake, a sequel, and a meta sequel. That’s right- this movie is a sequel to the REAL LIFE MURDERS that inspired the original film, and deals with the consequences of sensationalizing them with a movie. The cast is also a who’s who of prominent character actors – Veronica Cartwright, Gary Cole, Denis O’Hare, Anthony Anderson, Spencer Treat Clark, Ed Lauter and Edward Herrmann. If emotional hometown slasher movies are your thing, chances are you’re gonna dig this lesser known flick.

The Town That Dreaded Sundown 2004


96. The New York Ripper (1982)

Community choice by Andy Roberts – @RacketyEsperus

This Italian giallo-slasher hybrid from Italian Godfather of Gore Lucio Fulci is likely to be the most intensely sleazy, sexualised, misogynistic experience ever etched onto celluloid. A spate of intensely violent murders of women in New York City is worrying Lt. Williams, especially as the killer frequently calls him with a mocking Donald Duck-esque voice. As the bodies pile up in an ever-increasingly mutilated fashion, a young woman called Faye who has survived one of the attacks may just hold the key to solving the sick killer’s identity and motives. With an incredibly grimy New York aesthetic, grotesque and cold characters and hyper-violent, unrelenting sexualised violence inflicted on the primarily female cast, this film is one to wash off you after you’ve survived till the end.

The New York Ripper 1982


97. Mother’s Day (1980)

Community choice by Andy Roberts – @RacketyEsperus

Melding the traditions of the slasher with the more extreme rape and revenge genre, Mother’s Day is a memorable trash curio from Charles Kaufman, brother of the well-known Lloyd Kaufman of Troma infamy. Three best friends, Trina, Jackie and Abbey, embark on an annual get-together, choosing to go hiking and camping in the wilderness of New Jersey. Shortly after settling in, the trio are kidnapped by two backwoods hicks and taken to their shack, where they proceed to torture and rape the women while their cantankerous elderly mother coos approvingly. After one of the trio succumbs to her injuries, the two remaining girls decide to avenge their fallen friend, bringing a poetic wave of vengeance upon the hillbilly murderers. Humorously non-PC and gratuitous to boot, Mother’s Day still manages to feature some societal subtext underneath its heavy layer of sleaze and scuzz.

Mother's Day 1980


98. Graduation Day (1981)

Community choice by Andy Roberts – @RacketyEsperus

Another entry into the pantheon of high school slashers like Prom Night, Slaughter High and Pranks, Graduation Day was one of the most successful low budget slashers of its year, managing to fully capitalise on the lucrative era. Sprinter Laura manages to beat a high school record in her track event, but fatally collapses after she reaches the finishing line. Shortly afterwards, an enigmatic killer begins stalking the remainder of the track team, chasing and slaughtering them within Laura’s slim record time. With a plethora of suspects including Laura’s sister Anne and the tough Coach Michaels, will the killer’s identity be revealed before the final hurdle. Starting the trend of exercise themed slashers (like Killer Workout and Death Spa), Graduation Day is suitably bloody, entertaining and has enough curious set-pieces to keep things fresh!

Graduation Day 1981 Bloody Neck


99. Maniac (1980)

Community choice by Keegan Hughes@fearfulfreq

It’s hard to be ready to watch a movie like Maniac. And to be honest? That’s a compliment.

Jam-packed with more violence and weird sexual hangups than you can imagine, it’s an assault on your senses. Nobody finishes Maniac without feeling a little grimy.

Joe Spinell leads the charge into depravity, by writing the story and starring as the titular Maniac, Frank Zito. See, beauty is a crime to Frank, and he’s the judge, jury, and executioner. Running around the city at night, he employs all sorts of tools and techniques to kill attractive women. But just killing them isn’t enough. In all his gibbering glory, he scalps each one of his victims, and fastens their bloody hair to mannequins in his apartment. Imagine the smell!

Frank is terrifying in his ability to elicit some kind of strange sympathy, and then absolutely eviscerate somebody in a trance-like killer rage. Also, the way he talks to his hair-transplant pals at home makes one’s skin crawl.

All of this lunacy is topped off by special effects legend Tom Savini serving as the flick’s make-up artist. Each kill is beautifully grotesque in a way only Savini could imagine. Plus, he dons his acting pants and plays the part of shotgun victim!

The end of Maniac is one for the record books, too, with Frank’s harem of gore-covered mannequins coming to life and tearing him to pieces. Some ugly comeuppance after a plethora of ugly kills.

Maniac 1980 Movie Still


100. House of Wax (2005)

Community choice by Kim Morrison@wickedsister69

While the 2005 House of Wax bares little resemblance to the 1953 film, which is itself a remake of Mystery of the Wax Museum (1933), it is still a phenomenal entry into the slasher sub-genre. This time it’s not just a creepy wax museum that’s at the centre of a story, but an entire town which has been transformed into a wax display for any unlucky visitors to the town of Ambrose. House of Wax deserves credit for its kill scenes alone, a lot of which involve molten wax, and one of which involves Paris Hilton getting a pipe through her face.

House of Wax 2005

RELATED: BRUCE MARKUSEN RANKS 6 CLASSIC UNIVERSAL STUDIOS MONSTERS

Advertisement
Comments
Advertisement

Facebook

Featured Trailer

Advertisement

Trending